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The Divorced Mum Financial Survival Guide

divorced-mum

Post Divorce Recovery Strategies:
Divorced Mums Financial Survival Guide

Divorce can be a devastating experience but when combined with the increased financial pressures it can often be too much to bear. Hasty decisions about assets are often made during the post-settlement period of turmoil which can lead to undesirable investment outcomes for both parties.

Of course, divorced Mums face a unique set of circumstances than divorced Dads which is why this article has been written specifically for divorced Mums and the challenges they face (to read the Divorced Dads survival guide click here).

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The Divorced Dad Financial Survival Guide

Post Divorce Recovery Strategies:
Divorced Dads Financial Survival Guide

divorced-dads

If we were to run a competition for divorced Dads, with the winner being the one who made the most financial mistakes during divorce, the field would be enormous and the stakes are high. It’s sad, but true.

Most Dads make mistake after mistake with financial settlements and they need help. This article is written specifically for divorced Dads and the many challenges they face in their post-divorce recovery (don’t worry, we’ll return to cover the specific and very different issues facing divorced Mums in a future article).

Regrettably, I can’t patch up the differences that contributed to the end of your marriage but what I can do is make sure that both parents are afforded every opportunity to recover to their best possible outcome financially.

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Next Seminar – Wednesday 22nd of November 6pm

In Australia, the figures are staggering with around 60% of employees are disengaged with their workplaces – they do what is asked of them in getting the job done, pick up their pay and go home.

Worse, around 16% are actively disengaged in their workplaces. These are people who are actively a burden on your workplace.

This leaves around 24% who are actively engaged – proactive in working to improve workplaces. Such people are gold! Want to know how to lift engagement?

Look in the mirror!

Relationships in life and at work are key drivers to engagement and knowing more about yourself either as an employee or manager and especially if you are self-employed will improve your engagement / satisfaction levels to new highs!

Seminar Details

The Best Leaders look in the Mirror” Wayne Dyson & Dr Steven Enticott
www.bridgeworks.com.au/the-best-leaders-are-prepared-to-look-in-the-mirror/

Date: Wednesday 22nd of November
Time: 6.00pm to 7.15pm
Location: Kingston Arts Centre 979 Nepean Hwy Moorabbin
Opposite CIA Tax’s Office!

Parking is available at the rear of Kingston City Hall. Enter via South Road or Nepean Hwy (service road).

 

Dates for the diary!

CIA tax’s informative sessions:

Wednesday February 21st – 2018

(SGT) Superannuation guarantee tax

the ATO change in attitude

https://www.ato.gov.au/business/super-for-employers/paying-super-contributions/missed-and-late-payments/the-super-guarantee-charge-(sgc)/

 

Wednesday March 21st –  2018

(PPR) Personal property registrations

http://www.edxppsr.com.au/About+PPS/Introducing+the+PPSA.html

 

Wednesday May 2nd  2018

(Estates) Tax and the Executors Role

https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/document?docid=COG/PCG201712/NAT/ATO/00001

 

Wednesday 6th of June 2018

(EOFY) End of Financial year tax planning’s

http://ciatax.com.au/


Big dates for the diary!

Wednesday the 11th  of October

“Two Common Finance Mistakes made in Business”
Chinmay Ananda & Dr Steven Enticott – INVITE DETAILS BELOW!

http://www.financeacademy.com.au

 

Wednesday the 22nd of November

“The Best Leaders look in the“Mirror”

Wayne Dyson & Dr Steven Enticott

www.bridgeworks.com.au/the-best-leaders-are-prepared-to-look-in-the-mirror/

 

Wednesday February 21st – 2018  

(SGT) Superannuation guarantee tax
the ATO change in attitude

https://www.ato.gov.au/business/super-for-employers/paying-super-contributions/missed-and-late-payments/the-super-guarantee-charge-(sgc)/

 

Wednesday March 21st –  2018  

(PPR) Personal property registrations

http://www.edxppsr.com.au/About+PPS/Introducing+the+PPSA.html

 

Wednesday May 2nd  2018  

(Estates) Tax and the Executors Role

https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/document?docid=COG/PCG201712/NAT/ATO/00001

 

Wednesday 6th of June 2018  

(EOFY) End of Financial year tax planning’s

http://ciatax.com.au/

 

INVITATION – CIA tax

Wednesday the 11th  of October  

“Two Common Finance Mistakes made in Business” 

Chinmay Ananda with Dr Steven Enticott

http://www.financeacademy.com.au


Tax Checklist 2017

1. Download the renowned CIA Tax “Tax-Checklist”.
By far and away this is our most complimented complimentary service of CIA tax’s each year.

2. Review a copy of last year’s tax return as a starting prompt for collating the required data you’ll need for this year’s tax return.

3. Always see an accountant! Fees are a tax deduction and so to are the travel costs to see one. Great accountants know tax backwards and will ensure better tax results.

Download your Individual Tax Return Checklist


Tax Time 2017

Co-contributions for super is something you should DO. Yes the government reduced the matching rate to 50% (meaning a 50% return on your money instead of a 100% return!!) and lowered the maximum amount to $500 yet It is still money FREE from the ATO to your super!

You must earn below an income (must plus FBT) of $51,021 to potentially qualify, details:
https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Super/In-detail/Growing/Super-co-contribution/

Small Businesses prepay your expenses where you can and don’t be too hasty getting out your invoices prior to June 30 if it’s been a great income year.

Don’t forget the $20,000 immediate deduction on assets has again been extended another 12 months (2018) for those with a turnover below $10m.

Stocktakes, if you have stock you will need to get out there and do the dreaded count Stock can also be counted on Cost, Replacement, or Actual values.

Super contributions to be claimed in this tax year they need to be paid before June 30 and yes in many cases you should contribute to super for example; An average earner saves 19.5% of tax on their contribution so even if they put the money into the safe cash option of the fund they have already had one great investment year!. However if you are bit on the younger side burdened with a lot of bad debt (non-investment lending) then speak to us about doing the numbers on super contributions first

Individuals make sure you have paid for all your work related expenses prior to June 30, bring ones forward if you can when you’ve had a great income year becomes even more important.

Made a capital gain during the past year, for example, the sale or part sale of a business (including investments the business has made), shares or a property. If the answer is a ‘yes’ then you should be thinking about your options for managing the CGT liability. Start by looking for capital losses to offset the CGT liability (or losses carried forward from prior years) and consider selling out losses before June 30 to offset gains – call us to discuss other methods.

Medicare levy surcharge and Rebate Reduction income tests
For the rates of Medicare levy surcharge that applies or the amount of rebate you are entitled to see the rebate and surcharge levels applicable for 2017/8 are (next page):

For a Federal Budget update  www.ciatax.com.au/federal-budget-2017

•Single parents and couples (including de facto couples) are subject to family tiers.

• Single parents and couples (including de facto couples) are subject to family tiers.

Superannuation No changes for 2017 tax year concessional amounts:

For those aged 50 the concessional cap payments into super are $35,000 and for the rest of the younger ones they can contribute $30,000 per year.

For under 65’s they may be able to also contribute $540,000 Non-Concessional all at once.

For over 65’s they will need to pass the work test and forget about it over 75 sadly.

  • Significant budget 2018 changes consult with CIA before making any changes but the main one to consider now is the new maximum for tax deductible contributions will be $25,000 for all age groups.

Don’t forget – Sunglasses, Hats and Sunscreen for taxpayers that work in any outdoor occupation (including driving) they are tax deductible However they cannot be claimed unless you keep the receipt!

Claim Everything This one each year is a bit tongue in cheek, though correctly claiming expenses is our expertise. Your job is to think of absolutely anything that has a connection with your incomes and let us measure the appropriateness of claim.


Federal Budget 2017/18

2017/18 Federal Budget Highlights

Mr Scott Morrison, the Federal Treasurer, has handed down his second Budget (the government’s first of its three-year term). Mr Morrison said the Budget is focused on boosting the economy and households, so that “we live within our means and are able to return the Budget to balance in 2020/21”.

The government is proposing to address the housing affordability crisis with a package of tax, superannuation and other measures. Additionally, the Budget contains measures intended to ensure the integrity of the tax and superannuation system.

The full Budget papers are available at www.budget.gov.au and the Treasury ministers’ media releases are available at ministers.treasury.gov.au.

The tax and superannuation highlights are set out below.

Housing affordability measures

  • A limited amount of an individual’s superannuation contributions made from 1 July 2017 may be withdrawn from 1 July 2018 onwards for a first home deposit.
  • A person aged 65 or over can contribute up to $300,000 from the proceeds of the sale of their home as a non-concessional contribution into superannuation, from 1 July 2018.
  • Deductions for travel expenses related to inspecting, maintaining or collecting rent for a residential rental property will be disallowed from 1 July 2017.
  • Plant and equipment depreciation deductions will be limited to outlays actually incurred by investors in residential real estate properties from 1 July 2017.
  • Managed investment trusts will be able to invest in affordable housing, allowing investors to receive concessional tax treatment, provided certain conditions are met, including that the properties are let as affordable housing for at least 10 years.
  • The CGT discount for Australian resident individuals investing in qualifying affordable housing will be increased from 50% to 60% from 1 January 2018.
  • Foreign and temporary tax residents will be denied access to the CGT main residence exemption.
  • The foreign resident CGT withholding rate will be increased to 12.5% and will apply to Australian real property and related interests valued at $750,000 or more.
  • An annual levy of at least $5,000 will be imposed on foreign owners of under-utilised residential property.
  • A 50% cap on foreign ownership in new developments will be introduced through a condition on new dwelling exemption certificates.
  • The principal asset test in Div 855 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 will be applied on an associate inclusive basis for foreign tax residents with indirect interests in Australian real property.

Tax integrity measures

  • The multinational anti-avoidance law will be amended to prevent the use of foreign trusts and partnerships in corporate structures for tax minimisation, with retrospective effect from 1 January 2016.
  • Hybrid mismatch rules used by banks to minimise tax in cross border transactions will be prohibited from 1 January 2018.
  • The government will provide $28.2m to the ATO to target serious and organised crime in the tax system.
  • The Black Economy Taskforce has delivered an interim report to the government and the government has accepted some recommendations for immediate action.
  • The taxable payments reporting system will be extended to contractors in the courier and cleaning industries from 1 July 2018.
  • Sales suppression technology and software, used to understate business income by deleting electronic transactions, will be prohibited.
  • Funding for the ATO’s Black Economy Taskforce audit and compliance activities will be extended until 30 June 2018.
  • A two-year public information campaign from 2016/17 will highlight the government’s key tax integrity measures.

Small business

  • Access to the small business CGT concessions will be tightened from 1 July 2017 to deny eligibility for assets which are unrelated to the small business.
  • The $20,000 instant asset write-off for small business will be extended by 12 months to 30 June 2018, for businesses with an aggregated annual turnover of less than $10m.

GST

  • Purchasers of new residential properties or new subdivisions will be required to remit the GST directly to the ATO as part of settlement from 1 July 2018.
  • The GST treatment of digital currency (such as Bitcoin) will be aligned with that of money from 1 July 2017.
  • Access to diplomatic and consular concessions under the Indirect Tax Concession Scheme has been extended.

Superannuation

  • The use of limited recourse borrowing arrangements will be included in a member’s total superannuation balance and transfer balance cap from 1 July 2017.
  • Opportunities for members to use related party transactions on non-commercial terms to increase superannuation savings will be reduced from 1 July 2018.
  • The current tax relief for merging superannuation funds will be extended until 1 July 2020.

Individuals

  • The Medicare levy will be increased from 2.0% to 2.5% of taxable income from 1 July 2019. Other tax rates that are linked to the top personal tax rate, such as the fringe benefits tax rate, will also be increased.
  • The Medicare levy low-income thresholds for singles, families, and seniors and pensioners will increase from the 2016/17 income year.
  • A new set of repayment thresholds and rates under the higher education loan program (HELP) will be introduced from 1 July 2018.

Housing affordability measures

Access to super for first home deposit

Individuals will be able to make voluntary contributions into their superannuation of up to $15,000 per year and $30,000 in total, to be withdrawn subsequently for a first home deposit. The contributions can be made from 1 July 2017 and must be made within an individual’s existing contribution caps.

From 1 July 2018 onwards, the individual will be able to withdraw these contributions and their associated deemed earnings for a first home deposit. The withdrawals will be taxed at an individual’s marginal tax rate, less a 30% tax offset.

Under this new first home super saver scheme, both members of a couple can take advantage of this measure to buy their first home together. The scheme is intended to provide an incentive to enable first home buyers to build savings faster for a home deposit, by accessing the tax advantages of superannuation.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 30; Treasurer’s media release “Reducing Pressure on Housing Affordability”, 9 May 2017.

Super contributions from downsizing

A person aged 65 or over can make a non-concessional contribution into superannuation of up to $300,000 from the proceeds of selling their principal residence. They must have owned their principal residence for at least 10 years. This measure will apply from 1 July 2018 and is available to both members of a couple for the same home.

These contributions are in addition to existing rules and caps and are exempt from the age test, work test and the $1.6m total superannuation balance test for making non-concessional contributions.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 28.

Travel expenses related to residential rental properties disallowed

Deductions for travel expenses related to inspecting, maintaining or collecting rent for a residential rental property will be disallowed from 1 July 2017.

This is an integrity measure to address concerns that many taxpayers have been claiming travel deductions without correctly apportioning costs, or have claimed travel costs that were for private travel purposes.

This measure will not prevent investors from engaging third parties such as real estate agents for property management services. These expenses will remain deductible.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 29.

Depreciation deductions limited for residential rental properties

Plant and equipment depreciation deductions will be limited to outlays actually incurred by investors in residential real estate properties from 1 July 2017.

Plant and equipment items are usually mechanical fixtures or those which can be “easily” removed from a property such as dishwashers and ceiling fans. This is an integrity measure to address concerns that some plant and equipment items are being depreciated by successive investors in excess of their actual value. Acquisitions of existing plant and equipment items will be reflected in the cost base for capital gains tax purposes for subsequent investors.

These changes will apply on a prospective basis, with existing investments grandfathered. Plant and equipment forming part of residential investment properties as of 9 May 2017 (including contracts already entered into at 7:30pm (AEST) on 9 May 2017) will continue to give rise to deductions for depreciation until either the investor no longer owns the asset, or the asset reaches the end of its effective life.

Investors who purchase plant and equipment for their residential investment property after 9 May 2017 will be able to claim a deduction over the effective life of the asset. However, subsequent owners of a property will be unable to claim deductions for plant and equipment purchased by a previous owner of that property.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 30.

CGT discount increased for affordable housing investments

The CGT discount will be increased from 50% to 60% for Australian resident individuals investing in qualifying affordable housing.

The conditions to access the 60% discount are:

  • the housing must be provided to low to moderate income tenants
  • rent must be charged at a discount below the private rental market rate
  • the affordable housing must be managed through a registered community housing provider, and
  • the investment must be held for a minimum period of three years.

This measure will apply from 1 January 2018.

The higher discount will flow through to resident individuals investing in affordable housing via managed investment trusts as part of the tax measure enabling such trusts to invest in affordable housing (see the item “Managed investment trusts investing in affordable housing”).

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 29.

Managed investment trusts investing in affordable housing

Managed investment trusts (MITs) will be able to invest in affordable housing, allowing investors to receive concessional tax treatment.

MITs allow investors to pool funds to invest in primarily passive investments and cannot carry on or control an active trading business

CGT main residence exemption removed for foreign and temporary residents

Individuals who are foreign or temporary tax residents will no longer have access to the CGT main residence exemption from 7.30pm (AEST) on 9 May 2017.

Existing properties held before this date will be grandfathered until 30 June 2019.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 27.

Expansion of foreign resident CGT withholding regime

The CGT withholding rate that applies to foreign tax residents will be increased from 10% to 12.5% from 1 July 2017.

Currently, the foreign resident CGT withholding obligation applies to Australian real property and related interests valued at $2m or more. This threshold will be reduced to $750,000 from 1 July 2017, increasing the range of properties and interests that will come within this obligation.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 27.

Annual levy for foreign-owned vacant residential properties

Foreign owners of vacant residential property, or property that is not genuinely available on the rental market for at least six months per year, will be charged an annual levy of at least $5,000. The annual levy will be equivalent to the relevant foreign investment application fee imposed on the property when it was acquired.

The measure will apply to persons who make a foreign investment application for residential property from 7.30pm (AEST) on 9 May 2017.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 27; Treasurer’s media release “Reducing Pressure on Housing Affordability”, 9 May 2017.

Foreign ownership in new developments restricted to 50%

A 50% cap on foreign ownership in new developments will be introduced through a condition on new dwelling exemption certificates. The cap will be included as a condition on new dwelling exemption certificates where the application was made from 7:30pm (AEST) on 9 May 2017.

New dwelling exemption certificates are granted to property developers and act as a pre-approval allowing the sale of new dwellings in a specified development to foreign persons (without each foreign purchaser seeking their own foreign investment approval). The current certificates do not limit the amount of sales that may be made to foreign purchasers.

The measure will ensure that a minimum proportion of developments are available for Australians to purchase.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 31.

Payments reporting extended to couriers and cleaners

The government will extend the taxable payments reporting system (TPRS) to contractors in the courier and cleaning industries. The measure will have effect from 1 July 2018 and is estimated to have a gain to revenue of $318m in the forward estimates period.

The TPRS is a transparency measure and already operates in the building and construction industry, where it has resulted in improved contractor compliance. Under the TPRS, businesses are required to report payments they make to contractors (individual and total for the year) to the ATO.

This measure brings payments to contractors in the courier and cleaning industries into line with wages paid to similar workers, which are reported to the ATO. Businesses in these industries will need to ensure that they collect information from 1 July 2018, with the first annual report required in August 2019.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 35.

Black Economy Taskforce funding extended

The government will provide additional funds of $32m to extend the ATO’s audit and compliance programs targeting black economy risks. This funding was to expire on 30 June 2017.

Under this measure, a further year of funding will be provided for the ATO’s “Strengthening Foundations” and “Level Playing Field” programs. “Strengthening Foundations” focuses on businesses with a turnover between $2m and $15m that have disengaged from the tax system. The “Level Playing Field” program involves audit, review and intensive follow up and targets small businesses with turnover below $2m.

These programs are directed at changing black economy and related behaviours such as non-lodgement, omission of income and non-payment of employer obligations. The government will make decisions about the future of these programs beyond 2017/18 in light of the Black Economy Taskforce’s final report, which is expected to be delivered in October 2017.

This measure is estimated to have a net gain to the budget of $447.2m over the forward estimates period. The revenue includes an additional GST component of $109.8m which will be paid to the states and territories.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, pp 35–36.

Instant asset write-off extended for 12 months

The $20,000 instant asset write-off for small business will be extended by 12 months to 30 June 2018, for businesses with an aggregated annual turnover of less than $10m.

Small businesses will be able to immediately deduct purchases of eligible depreciating assets costing less than $20,000 provided they are first used, or installed ready for use, by 30 June 2018. Only a few assets are ineligible (such as horticultural plants and in-house software).

Depreciating assets valued at $20,000 or more (which cannot be immediately deducted) can continue to be placed into the general small business pool (the pool) and depreciated at 15% in the first income year, and 30% for each income year thereafter. The pool can also be immediately deducted if the balance is less than $20,000 over this period (including existing pools).

The current “lock out” laws from the simplified depreciation rules will continue to be suspended until 30 June 2018. These rules prevent small businesses from re-entering the simplified depreciation regime for five years if they opt out.

From 1 July 2018, the immediate deductibility threshold, and the balance at which the pool can be immediately deducted, will revert to $1,000.

This measure is designed to improve cash flow for small businesses, providing a boost to small business activity and investment for another year. It is estimated to have a cost to revenue of $650m over the forward estimates period.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, pp 21–22; Treasurer’s media release, “Stronger growth to create more and better paying jobs”, 9 May 2017; Minister for Small Business media release, “Budget boost for small business”, 9 May 2017; and Budget 2017-18 Glossy: Stronger growth to create more and better paying jobs, pp 5–6.

Purchasers of new residential properties to remit GST

Purchasers of newly constructed residential properties or new subdivisions will be required to remit the GST directly to the ATO as part of settlement from 1 July 2018.

Under the current law (where the GST is included in the purchase price and the developer remits the GST to the ATO), some developers are failing to remit the GST to the ATO despite having claimed GST credits on their construction costs. The new measure is an integrity measure to strengthen compliance with the GST law.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 38.

Double taxation of digital currency removed

The GST treatment of digital currency (such as Bitcoin) will be aligned with that of money from 1 July 2017.

Digital currency is currently treated as intangible property for GST purposes. Consequently, consumers who use digital currencies as payment can effectively bear GST twice: once on the purchase of the digital currency, and again on its use in exchange for other goods and services subject to GST.

This measure will ensure purchases of digital currency are no longer subject to GST. Removing double taxation on digital currencies will remove an obstacle for the financial technology (fintech) sector to grow in Australia.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, pp 22–23.

LRBAs included in super balance and transfer balance cap

The use of limited recourse borrowing arrangements (LRBAs) will be included in a member’s total superannuation balance and transfer balance cap from 1 July 2017.

LRBAs can be used to circumvent contribution caps and effectively transfer growth in assets from the accumulation phase to the retirement phase that is not captured by the transfer balance cap. The outstanding balance of an LRBA will now be included in a member’s annual total superannuation balance and the repayment of the principal and interest of an LRBA from a member’s accumulation account will be a credit in the member’s transfer balance account.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 33.

Medicare levy to increase from 2.0% to 2.5%

The Medicare levy will be increased from 2.0% to 2.5% of taxable income from 1 July 2019. Other tax rates that are linked to the top personal tax rate, such as the fringe benefits tax rate, will also be increased.

Low income earners will continue to receive relief from the Medicare levy through the low income thresholds for singles, families, seniors and pensioners. The current exemptions from the Medicare levy will also remain in place.

This measure is estimated to have a gain to tax revenue of $8.2b over the forward estimates period (across all heads of revenue, not just the Medicare levy).

All revenue generated by the Medicare levy will be used to support the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and to guarantee Medicare. For example, $9.1b will be credited over the forward estimates period to the NDIS Savings Fund Special Account when it is established.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, pp 24–25; and Budget 2017–18 Glossy: Budget overview, p 16.

Medicare levy — low income thresholds to increase

The Medicare levy low-income thresholds for singles, families, and seniors and pensioners will increase from the 2016/17 income year.

The threshold for singles will increase to $21,655 (up from $21,335 for the 2015/16 year).

The family threshold will increase to $36,541 (up from $36,001 for the 2015/16 year).

For single seniors and pensioners, the threshold will increase to $34,244 (up from $33,738 for the 2015/16 year). The family threshold for seniors and pensioners will increase to $47,670 (up from $46,966 for the 2015/16 year).

The child-student component of the income threshold for all families will increase to $3,356 (up from $3,306 for the 2015/16 year).

The increases take into account movements in the consumer price index so that low-income taxpayers generally continue to be exempted from paying the Medicare levy.

This measure is estimated to have a cost to revenue of $180m over the forward estimates period.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 25.

New HELP repayment thresholds and rates to be introduced

A new set of repayment thresholds and rates under the higher education loan program (HELP) will be introduced from 1 July 2018.

A new minimum repayment threshold of $42,000 will be established with a 1% repayment rate. Currently, the minimum repayment threshold for the 2017/18 year is $55,874 with a repayment rate of 4%.

A maximum threshold of $119,882 with a 10% repayment rate will also be introduced. Currently, the maximum repayment threshold for the 2017/18 year is $103,766 with a repayment rate of 8%.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 83.

Major bank levy to be introduced

A major bank levy (the levy) will be introduced for authorised deposit taking institutions (ADIs), with licensed entity liabilities of at least $100b, from 1 July 2017.

The $100b threshold will be indexed to grow in line with nominal gross domestic product.

The levy will be calculated quarterly as 0.015% of an ADI’s licensed entity liabilities as at each quarterly reporting date mandated by the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA). This equates to an annualised rate of 0.06%.

Liabilities subject to the levy will include items such as corporate bonds, commercial paper, certificates of deposit, and Tier-2 capital instruments. The levy will not apply to the following liabilities: additional Tier-1 capital, and deposits of individuals, businesses and other entities protected by the Financial Claims Scheme. It will not be levied on mortgages.

Superannuation funds and insurance companies will not be subject to the levy.

The levy is forecast to raise $6.2b over the forward estimates period, net of interactions with other taxes (principally corporate income taxes). The levy is designed to assist with budget repair and to provide a more level playing field for smaller banks and non-bank competitors. It complements prudential reforms being implemented by the government and APRA.

To facilitate the introduction of the levy, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) will undertake a residential mortgage pricing inquiry until 30 June 2018. As part of this inquiry, the ACCC will be able to require relevant ADIs to explain changes or proposed changes to residential mortgage pricing, including changes to fees, charges, or interest rates by those ADIs.

Source: Budget Paper No 2, p 24; and Budget 2017–18 Glossy: Guaranteeing the essentials for Australians, p 17.